The 16 Primordial Concepts of Neholek

Here's a short collection of informations about the 16 primordial concepts of Neholek. Each one illustrate a sacred aspect of the Nehobi society, and their associated syllables, very prolific in word constructions, are written with a unique syllable glyph instead of letters.

ka  : Life

The primordial concept of Life, ka [ˈɑɪ.kɑ], is associated with the syllable æ /ɑɪ/.

ka is the beginning of existence. The things that lives, the things that are. As a verb root, it's about existing, living, while as an adverb, it refers to a creative process.

The akconesá of ka is the initial (=inchoative), that marks the beginning a process.

Nehó  : Death

The primordial concept of Death, Nehó [neˈxo], is associated with the syllable ne /ne/.

Nehó is the end of the existence. The things that dies, the things that are destroyed. As a verb root, it's used to illustrate the end of something, whether its death or its destruction, while as an adverb, it refers to a destructive process.

The akconesá of Nehó is the mortal (=cessative), that marks the end of a process.

Doli  : Undetermination

The primordial concept of Undetermination, Doli [ɖɔlʲ], is associated with the syllable do /ɖɔ/.

Doli is the unknown, the expected. The theories about the unkown world. As a verb root, it's all about what's theorical, what could be, while as an adverb, it's used to form yes-no questions, to determine the possibility of a given situation.

The akconesá of Doli is the conditional, that marks the requirement for a process to happen.

Ditos  : Impossibility

The primordial concept of Impossibility, Ditos [ˈɖi.ʈos], is associated with the syllable di /ɖi/.

Ditos is the impossible things. What we know can't be done, can't be. As a verb root, it is used to forbid things, while as an adverb, it indicates that the things can't happen.

The akconesá of Ditos is the antifactual, indicating what we know to be false.

Tedos  : Space

The primordial concept of Space, Tedos [ˈʈɛ.ɖos], is associated with the syllable to /ʈɔ/.

Tedos is the area, the location. Where the things are, the places. As a verb root, it allows to locate places, while as an adverb, it precises that the process happens right here.

The akconesá of Tedos is the positional, indicating that the thing happens at the object's position, not mandatorily to the object of the sentence.

Tele  : Distance

The primordial concept of Distance, Tele [ˈʈɛ.lɛ], is associated with the syllable te /ʈɛ/.

Tele is the movement towards a far objective. As a verb root, it's all about to go somewhere, while as an adverb, it precises that the process happens far from the speaker.

The akconesá of Tele is the distancial, and once again it indicates that the action happened far away.

Khonos  : Time

The primordial concept of Time, Khonos [ˈkxɔ.nos], is associated with the syllable kho /kxɔ/.

Khonos is the moment. The exact location in the timeline. As a verb root, it permits to date, to precise that the process happens at a specific moment, while as an adverb, that it happens daily (because the derived noun also means « day »).

The akconesá of Khonos is the ponctual (=semelfactive), indicating that the process happens only once.

Sína  : Continuity

The primordial concept of Continuity, Sína [ˈsiː.nɑ], is associated with the syllable sí /siː/.

Sína is the timeline. The things we wait for, the things we keep doing. As a verb root, it implies waiting for something, while as an adverb, it means the process is repeated over a period of time.

The akconesá of Sína is the continual (=durative), for a process that lasts in time.

Pána  : Knowledge

The primordial concept of Knowledge, Pána [ˈpɑː.nɑ], is associated with the syllable pá /pɑː/.

Pána is what we know. What's established. Truth. As a verb root, it refers to what we know or study, while as an adverb, it's all about what we do knowingly, anticipating the consequences.

The akconesá of Pána is the factual, what is established to be true.

Cone  : Energy

The primordial concept of Energy, Cone [ˈʃɔ.nɛ], is associated with the syllable co /ʃɔ/.

Cone is the energy. The potential in all things, all actions, all ideas. As a verb root, it's what we can be(come), while as an adverb, is how we feel it, how it seems.

The akconesá of Cone is the potential, what we can do.

Meizi  : Matter

The primordial concept of Matter, Meizi [ˈmɛj.ʒi], is associated with the syllable mei /mɛj/.

Meizi is the physical things. Items, touchable things. As a verb root, it refers to crafting, building things, while as an adverb, it precises that the experience of the process is physical.

The akconesá of Meizi is the material, indicating that the speaker works hard to make the process actual.

Deci  : Deixis

The primordial concept of Deixis, Deci [ɖɛʃʲ], is associated to the syllable zi /ʒi/.

Deci is this. Or that. Or these. The deixis, that is to say what we can point out. As a verb root, it turns any action into a state, while as an adverb, it's the reflexive as you know it (=self).

The akconesá of Deci is the intentional, indicating the process is realized on purpose.

Poso  : Quantity

The primordial concept of Quantity, Poso [ˈpɔ.sɔ], is associated with the syllable pso /θɔ/.

Poso is the plural. Like, literally : that's how we mark the plural, by suffixing it to a word. As a "root", it means « a group of » what comes next in the word (so it's more of a prefix). As a verb root, it means counting, while as an adverb, it's very augmentative.

The akconesá of Poso is the incremential (=augmentative), that changes any verb into an amplified version of itself (shout/yell, walk/run, speak/discourse, and so on).

Ábi  : Entirety

The primordial concept of Entirety, Ábi [ˈɑː.ði], is associated with the syllable bi /bi/.

Ábi is everything. The whole group. The whole people. The collective grammatical number as a suffix. As a verb root, it deals with gathering things, while as an adverb, its about doing them together.

The akconesá of Ábi is the inferential (=evidential), what the the speaker have seen or heard.

Zíla  : Greatness

The primordial concept of Greatness, Zíla [ˈʒiː.lɑ], is associated with the syllable zí /ʒiː/.

Zíla is what's big. As a verb root, it's growing, getting bigger, while as an adverb, it's important.

The akconesá of Zíla is the usual, what we do often.

Sáhos  : Smallness

The primordial concept of Smallness, Sáhos [ˈsɑː.xos], is associated with the syllable sá /sɑː/.

Sáhos is what's small. As a verb root, it's shrinkening, getting smaller, while as an adverb, it's negligible.

The akconesá of Sáhos is the unusual, what we're not used to do.